P. Gabrielle Foreman

P. Gabrielle Foreman
Professor, English, Africana Studies & History
gforeman@udel.edu

Gabrielle Foreman is an award-winning teacher and scholar of African American studies and nineteenth-century literary history and culture who has published extensively on issues of race, slavery and reform with a focus on the past’s continuing hold on the world we inhabit today. She is the author of several widely known books and editions including Activist Sentiments: Reading Black Women Writers as well as a score of highly-regarded articles and book chapters. She is known for her collaborative work including a Penguin Classics edition of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig in which she and her co-editor “managed to pick up one of the coldest trails in nineteenth-century African American studies.” The radio tour that followed reached millions of listeners. At UD, Foreman has collaborated on dance/poetry performance pieces based on her research on Wilson as well as on David Drake, or “Dave the Potter,” Frances Harper and the Colored Conventions. Her current project is entitled The Art of DisMemory: Historicizing Slavery in Poetry, Performance and Material Culture. She is the Ned B. Allen Professor of English with appointments in History and Africana Studies and is a Senior Library Research Fellow. She is the founding faculty director of the prize-winning and NEH supported Colored Conventions Projects. She and CCP co-founders, UD graduate students Jim Casey and Sarah Patterson, are co-editing the forthcoming volume, Colored Conventions in the Nineteenth Century and the Digital Age. Her 2013 state of the field essay about how Blacks and other underrepresented communities are increasingly becoming tokens in scholarly areas in which they are the subjects of study calls for deliberate protocols to be implemented to address this ongoing trend by universities, leading repositories and professional organizations.